The question of whether or not to tell your partner about your sex life before you got together is a tricky one. No matter how relaxed and open the conversation is at the start, if the relationship progresses to love - and even marriage and kids - you may wish you hadn’t gone into quite so much detail. This is particularly true if you are still on speaking terms with some of your ex conquests! Jealousy can make even the strongest relationship toxic. 

Sex on Female First

Sex on Female First

Having said that, sexual health is something that is very relevant to anyone embarking on a new relationship. You cannot tell by looking at someone whether they have an infection. Indeed you would not necessarily know if you were carrying the infection yourself. Many common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as Chlamydia and Gonorrhea have very few symptoms in the early stages, however, if left untreated, they can lead to infertility and significant damage to long-term health including, in extreme cases, death.

The good news is that many STIs can be cured with antibiotics but unless you are aware that you are infected, you will continue to spread more than your love, to every partner you have, every partner they have, and so on. It is worth noting that infection can pass  through various forms of sexual contact, including vaginal, anal and oral sex, until the cycle is broken and treatment is sought.  

To prevent this from happening it is a really good idea to have a sexual health MOT. This may sound daunting but it is very easy to do. Sexual health clinics, also known as genitourinary medicine clinics, are free and open to anyone, no matter what their age. Some clinics hold sessions for specific groups including young people, gay men and lesbians. 

You can access testing and treatment for a range of STIs, including rapid testing for HIV, as well as advice and information. 

If you are given a clean bill of health you are free to go forth and copulate with impunity! If however, you are diagnosed with one of the STIs which can be treated with antibiotics you should avoid having unprotected sex until the infection has cleared. It is important to take the full course of antibiotics to ensure you are fully cured. Once your treatment is complete, you must then take the test again to ensure you are infection free. 

In addition to helping with STIs, Sexual health clinics also offer contraception (free condoms, the pill and emergency contraception) and pregnancy testing - so they can be extremely useful services to know.

While trust is a vital ingredient for any new relationship, if you have a sexual past, taking the necessary steps to ensure that all parties are healthy is an excellent foundation for a positive, loving (and infection free) future together.